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The EU's proposed copyright reform has passed a key hurdle with the European Parliament's Legal Affairs Committee approving the draft legislation. The committee also agreed to open negotiations with the European Commission and Council of the EU on a final version of the new law that aims to update copyright law for the growing consumption of online media, according Telecompaper. Key changes will include a right for publishers to claim compensation for snippets of their news and content being published by aggregators such as Google. In addition, online platforms such as YouTube will be subject to increased requirements for screening and blocking illegally uploaded content protected by copyright. 
 
The text approved by the committee limits what elements of a news article news aggregators can share without needing to pay the rightsholder a licence fee. The position earlier approved by the Council gave more room to EU member states to determine how much of a news article requires payment. 
 
The parliament's position also requires sharing platforms either to pay fees to rightholders whose content is uploaded on these platforms or to ensure that an upload containing copyrighted material is blocked if the platform will pay no fee. 
 
The committee attempted to curb fears the increased screening of uploaded content could result in censorship, saying "the measures put in place by upload platforms to control that uploads do not breach copyright, must also be designed in such a way so as not to catch 'non-infringing works'". These platforms will moreover be required to establish easy redress systems through which a person can request the reinstatement of an upload if s/he considers that it was wrongly taken down due to an alleged breach of copyright.
 
The committee text also specifies that uploading to online encyclopaedias in a non-commercial way, such as Wikipedia, or open source software platforms, such as GitHub, will automatically be excluded from the requirement to comply with copyright rules.
 
The committee also strengthens the negotiating rights of authors and performers, enabling them to claim additional remuneration from the party exploiting their rights when the remuneration originally agreed is "disproportionately" low compared to the benefits derived from the exploitation of the work. This should also include remuneration from any indirect revenues generated from exploiting the copyrighted signal. In addition, the committee grants authors and performers a right to revoke or terminate the exclusivity of an exploitation licence for their work if the party holding the rights is not exercising this right.
 
The decision to start tripartite negotiations will be announced at the opening of the Parliament's July plenary session. Until then, MEPs can challenge this decision and request that a vote by the full Parliament be taken on whether to launch negotiations.